https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/issue/feed Historical Studies in Education / Revue d'histoire de l'éducation 2019-11-27T08:18:47-08:00 Penney Clark and Mona Gleason, Co-Editors penney.clark@ubc.ca Open Journal Systems <p>We publish articles on every aspect of education, from pre-school to university education, on informal as well as formal education, and on methodological and historiographical issues. We also look forward to articles which reflect the methods and approaches of other disciplines.&nbsp;Articles are published in English or French, from scholars in universities and elsewhere, from Canadians and non-Canadians, from graduate students, teachers, researchers, archivists and curators of educational museums, and all those who are interested in this field.</p> <p>La Revue publie des articles portant sur tous les aspects de l'éducation, depuis la maternelle jusqu’à l’université, tant formelle qu'informelle, y compris des réflexions méthodologiques et historiographiques. La Revue est également ouverte aux contributions reflétant les méthodes et les approches propres à d'autres disciplines.&nbsp;Les articles publiés, en français ou en anglais, sont le fait de scientifiques, universitaires ou non, de Canadiens et de non Canadiens, d’étudiants diplômés, d’enseignants, de chercheurs, d’archivistes, de conservateurs de musées scolaires et, enfin, de tous ceux qui sont intéressés par le domaine de l’histoire de l’éducation.</p> https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4753 Table of Contents 2019-11-27T08:18:47-08:00 HSE / RHÉ k.gemmell@alumni.ubc.ca <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column">James Miles, "Historical Pageantry and Progressive Pedagogy at Canada’s 1927 Diamond Jubilee Celebration,"&nbsp;1–26.</div> </div> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p>Bruce Curtis, "Colonization, Education, and the Formation of Moral Character: Edward Gibbon Wakefield’s <em>A Letter from Sydney</em>,"&nbsp;27–47.</p> <p>Gerald Thomson, "The Determination of the Intellectual Equipment Is Imperative: Mental Hygiene, Problem Children, and the History of the Provincial Child Guidance Clinic of British Columbia, 1932–1958,"&nbsp;48–78.</p> <p>Andrée Dufour, "Le métier d’institutrice indépendante francophone à Montréal, 1869 –1915, "79–89.</p> <p><strong>Book Reviews/Comptes rendus</strong></p> <p>Clermont Barnabé et Pierre Toussaint, <em>L’administration de l’éducation : une perspective historique</em>&nbsp;| Alexandre Beaupré-Lavallée, 91–93.</p> <p>Samira El Atia, dir., <em>L’éducation supérieure et la dualité linguistique dans l’Ouest canadien. Défis et réalités |&nbsp;</em>Phyllis Dalley, 93–96.</p> <p>David Aubin, <em>L’élite sous la mitraille. Les normaliens, les mathématiques et la Grande Guerre 1900–1925 |&nbsp;</em>Mahdi Khelfaoui, 96–98.</p> <p>Daniel Poitras, <em>Expérience du temps et historiographie au XXe siècle — Michel de Certeau, François Furet et Fernand Dumont |&nbsp;</em>Philippe Momège, 98–100.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="page" title="Page 2"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p>Alexandre Lanoix, <em>Matière à mémoire. Les finalités de l'enseignement de l’histoire du Québec selon les enseignantE |&nbsp;</em>Andrea Mongelós Toledo, 100–102.</p> <p>Roderick J. Barman, editor, <em>Safe Haven: The Wartime Letters of Ben Barman and Margaret Penrose, 1940–1943 |&nbsp;</em>Isabel Campbell, 102–104.</p> <p>Theodore Michael Christou, <em>Progressive Rhetoric and Curriculum: Contested Visions of Public Education in Interwar Ontario |&nbsp;</em>Kurt Clausen, 104–106.</p> <p>Elizabeth Todd-Breland, <em>A Political Education: Black Politics and Education Reform in Chicago since the 1960s |&nbsp;</em>Esther Cyna, 106–108.</p> <p>Christabelle Sethna and Steve Hewitt, <em>Just Watch Us: RCMP Surveillance of the Women’s Liberation Movement in Cold War Canada |&nbsp;</em>Rose Fine-Meyer, 108–110.</p> <p>Brian Titley, <em>Into Silence and Servitude: How American Girls&nbsp;</em><em>Became Nuns, 1945–1965 |&nbsp;</em>Jacqueline Gresko, 111–112.</p> <p>Randall Curren and Charles Dorn, <em>Patriotic Education in a Global Age&nbsp;</em>and&nbsp;Sam Wineburg, <em>Why Learn History (When It’s Already on Your Phone) |&nbsp;</em>Lindsay Gibson, 113–117.</p> <p>Catherine Carstairs, Bethany Philpott, and Sara Wilmshurst, <em>Be Wise! Be Healthy! Morality and Citizenship in Canadian Public Health Campaigns |&nbsp;</em>Dan Malleck, 117–119.</p> <p>Raymond B. Blake and Matthew Hayday, editors,&nbsp;<em>Celebrating Canada, Volume 2: Commemorations, Anniversaries, and National Symbols |&nbsp;</em>Brenda Trofanenko, 119–121.</p> </div> </div> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column">&nbsp;</div> <div class="column"><strong>2018–2019 Reviewers for HSE-RHÉ /</strong>&nbsp;<strong>Les examinateurs de la RHÉ pour l’année 2018–2019</strong></div> </div> </div> 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4663 Historical Pageantry and Progressive Pedagogy at Canada’s 1927 Diamond Jubilee Celebration 2019-11-27T08:15:48-08:00 James Miles ja.miles@mail.utoronto.ca <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p>Historians have argued that Canada’s Diamond Jubilee of Confederation in 1927 represents one of the federal government’s most sustained and successful attempts at nation building in the interwar period. In this mass outpouring of patriotic celebration, schools in particular played an important role in producing commemorative events, but also in constructing an engaging and accessible historical narrative for public consumption. At the heart of these events was the staging of hundreds of historical pageants, including many performances produced by teachers and students. This article examines how progressive pedagogies, such as active and play-based learning, came to be aligned with nation-building initiatives in widely produced historical pageants. Furthermore, it examines two published historical pageant scripts performed in Ontario’s schools to reveal the dominant themes of the historical narratives being promoted in relation to Indigenous-settler relations, gender, and national identity.</p> </div> </div> </div> 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 James Miles https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4653 Colonization, Education, and the Formation of Moral Character: Edward Gibbon Wakefield’s A Letter from Sydney 2019-11-18T11:33:54-08:00 Bruce Curtis bruce_curtis@carleton.ca <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p>Edward Gibbon Wakefield proposed a scheme of “systematic colonization” that he claimed would guarantee the formation of civilized moral character in settler societies at the same time as it reproduced imperial class relations. The scheme, which was first hatched after Wakefield read Robert Gourlay’s <em>A Statistical Account of Upper Canada</em>, inverted the dominant understanding of the relation between school and society. Wakefield claimed that without systematic colonization, universal schooling would be dangerous and demoralizing. Wakefield intervened in contemporary debate about welfare reform and population growth, opposing attempts to enforce celibacy on poor women and arguing that free enjoyment of “animal liberty” made women both moral and beautiful.</p> </div> </div> </div> 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Bruce Curtis https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4632 The Determination of the Intellectual Equipment Is Imperative: Mental Hygiene, Problem Children, and the History of the Provincial Child Guidance Clinic of British Columbia, 1932–1958 2019-11-27T08:14:44-08:00 Gerald Thomson gerald.t@telus.net <p>The founding in 1932 of British Columbia’s provincial Child Guidance Clinic by Dr. A. L. Crease of Essondale Mental Hospital was seen as a medically progressive measure in the preventive work to stem mental ailments in children and prevent future adult mental illness. The clinic’s history and the influence of mental hygiene on early twentieth-century medical, educational, and social service agencies in BC that dealt with so-called “problem children” has received limited scholarly attention. This paper argues that the mental hygiene agenda was cultivated by psychiatrists working at mental asylums, teachers of “subnormal” children, child welfare advocates, and university-trained social workers, all of whom increasingly shaped child-saving policy in British Columbia. However, from its beginnings, the British Columbia provincial Child Guidance Clinic had an unstable clinical history and it was completely reorganized in 1946 and subsequently closed in 1958. The clinic’s history stood in stark contrast to Alberta’s child guidance clinics, which applied a rigid mental hygiene policy of eugenic sterilization until the early 1970s. This significant difference indicates the need for other detailed microhistories of child psychiatry and child guidance clinics across Canada.</p> 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Gerald Thomson https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4723 Le métier d’institutrice indépendante francophone à Montréal, 1869-1915 2019-11-18T11:34:07-08:00 Andrée Dufour andreedufour@gmail.com <p>In 2006, I published an article, “The first female lay teachers in Quebec. A Montreal Case Study, 1825-1835,” in the French journal, <em>Histoire de l’éducation</em> (no. 109). The women teachers that I wrote about, most of whom were anglophones, owned small, essentially private schools in which they taught a significant proportion of Montreal’s young population. They inspired francophone female lay teachers who imitated their system, imported recently from Britain. These francophone women would make the model of independent schoolmistress their own, adapting it throughout the nineteenth century, and even into the twentieth. This way, the women contributed through the schools they owned, which were often small, to educating a noteworthy margin of the city’s youth, notably in the nineteenth century. They did so despite the founding of the Montreal Catholic School Commission in 1846. Consequently, the present article deals in some detail with the educational contributions of these women teachers in this period, but more specifically between the years 1869 and 1915.</p> 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Andrée Dufour https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4763 Clermont Barnabé et Pierre Toussaint, L’administration de l’éducation : une perspective historique 2019-11-18T11:34:13-08:00 Alexandre Beaupré-Lavallée alexandre.beaupre-lavallee@umontreal.ca 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Alexandre Beaupré-Lavallée https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4765 Samira El Atia (dir.), L’éducation supérieure et la dualité linguistique dans l’Ouest canadien. -Défis et réalités 2019-11-18T11:34:13-08:00 Phyllis Dalley pdalley@uOttawa.ca 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Phyllis Dalley https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4767 David Aubin, L’élite sous la mitraille. Les normaliens, les mathématiques et la Grande Guerre 1900 –1925 2019-11-18T11:34:14-08:00 Mahdi Khelfaoui khelfaoui.mahdi@uqam.ca 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Mahdi Khelfaoui https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4769 Daniel Poitras, Expérience du temps et historiographie au XXe siècle — Michel de Certeau, François Furet et Fernand Dumont 2019-11-18T11:34:15-08:00 Philippe Momège Philippe.momege@umontreal.ca 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Philippe Momège https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4771 Alexandre Lanoix, Matière à mémoire. Les finalités de l’enseignement de l’histoire du Québec selon les enseignantEs 2019-11-18T11:34:16-08:00 Andrea Mongelós Toledo Andrea.Giselle.Mongelos.Toledo@usherbrooke.ca 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Andrea Mongelós Toledo https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4773 Roderick J. Barman, ed., Safe Haven: The Wartime Letters of Ben Barman and Margaret Penrose, 1940–1943 2019-11-18T11:34:17-08:00 Isabel Campbell isabel.campbell@forces.gc.ca 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Isabel Campbell https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4775 Theodore Michael Christou, Progressive Rhetoric and Curriculum: Contested Visions of Public Education in Interwar Ontario 2019-11-18T11:34:18-08:00 Kurt Clausen kurtc@nipissingu.ca 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Kurt Clausen https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4777 Elizabeth Todd-Breland, A Political Education: Black Politics and Education Reform in Chicago since the 1960 2019-11-18T11:34:19-08:00 Esther Cyna ecc2168@tc.columbia.edu 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4779 Christabelle Sethna and Steve Hewitt, Just Watch Us: RCMP Surveillance of the Women’s Liberation Movement in Cold War Canada 2019-11-18T11:34:20-08:00 Rose Fine-Meyer rose.fine.meyer@utoronto.ca 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4781 Brian Titley, Into Silence and Servitude: How American Girls Became Nuns, 1945–1965 2019-11-18T11:34:20-08:00 Jacqueline Gresko jgresko@telus.net 2019-11-17T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4783 Randall Curren and Charles Dorn, Patriotic Education in a Global Age & Sam Wineburg, Why Learn History (When It’s Already on Your Phone) 2019-11-18T11:34:21-08:00 Lindsay Gibson lindsay.gibson@ubc.ca 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4785 Catherine Carstairs, Bethany Philpott, and Sara Wilmshurst, Be Wise! Be Healthy! Morality and Citizenship in Canadian Public Health Campaigns 2019-11-18T11:34:22-08:00 Dan Malleck dmalleck@brocku.ca 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Dan Malleck https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4787 Raymond B. Blake and Matthew Hayday, eds., Celebrating Canada, Volume 2: Commemorations, Anniversaries, and National Symbols 2019-11-18T11:34:23-08:00 Brenda Trofanenko brenda.trofanenko@acadiau.ca 2019-11-18T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Brenda Trofanenko https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4755 2018–2019 Reviewers for HSE-RHÉ 2019-11-18T11:34:23-08:00 HSE / RHÉ k.gemmell@alumni.ubc.ca 2019-11-17T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4751 Contributors 2019-11-18T11:34:24-08:00 HSE / RHÉ k.gemmell@alumni.ubc.ca <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p><strong>Bruce Curtis</strong>, PhD, FRHistS, FRSC, is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. Among his recent contributions to the field of educational historiography are “Priority, politics and pedagogical science. Part I: the mental steam-engine” and “Priority, politics and pedagogical science. Part II: the priority dispute and a standard model of pedagogy,” both in <em>Paedagogica Historica</em> 52, no. 6 (2016), and <em>Ruling by Schooling Quebec: Conquest to Liberal Governmentality. A Historical Sociology</em> (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012).</p> <p>Détentrice d’un doctorat en histoire, <strong>Andrée Dufour</strong> a enseigné au cégep et à l’université pendant plus de vingt ans. Outre de nombreux articles sur l’histoire de l’éducation au Québec, on lui doit les ouvrages, <em>Tous à l’école, Histoire de l’éducation au Québec</em> et avec M. Dumont, <em>Brève histoire des institutrices au Québec de la Nouvelle-France à nos jours</em>. Maintenant retraitée, elle assume la codirection de l<em>’Atlas historique, l’École au Québec</em> qui paraîtra prochainement aux Presses de l’Université Laval.</p> <p><strong>James Miles</strong> is a PhD Candidate at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. His doctoral research examines the relationship between history education and campaigns to redress historical injustices in Canada, and is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.</p> <p><strong>Gerald Thomson</strong>, PhD, now retired, has worked as a special education teacher (Surrey School District #36), sessional lecturer in history of education in British Columbia (UBC Educational Studies), and professor of history of British Columbia (Kwantlen Polytechnic University History Faculty). He worked several summers at Woodlands School for special needs children and several years in Crease Clinic at Riverview Mental Hospital (formerly Essondale) on the nursing staff. Dr. Thomson has published numerous articles on the history of special education, the testing movement and mental hygiene in British Columbia in <em>HSE-RHÉ</em>, <em>BC Studies</em>, and <em>BC History Magazine</em>. He welcomes feedback and can be contacted at: gerald.t@telus.net.</p> </div> </div> </div> 2019-11-17T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) https://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/hse/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/4749 Guidelines for Authors 2019-11-18T11:34:29-08:00 HSE / RHÉ k.gemmell@alumni.ubc.ca <div class="page" title="Page 2"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p>For more information concerning submissions procedures, please refer to the following URL: <a href="http://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/about/submissions">http://historicalstudiesineducation.ca/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/about/submissions</a></p> </div> </div> </div> 2019-11-17T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c)